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Today’s daily desk copy request: Jane Bowles Two Serious Ladies: A Novel for a course on “writing and sexual politics.”
A cult classic and the only novel by Jane Bowles, the highly influential wife of Paul Bowles, Two Serious Ladies (1943) follows two upper-class women, Christina Goering and Frieda Copperfield, as they descend into debauchery. 
If that description isn’t enough to get you excited, you should also know that it was Tennessee Williams’ favorite novel AND your new source for under-utilized children’s games. 
Example: “I forgive you of all your sins.” 
This one comes from everyone’s favorite child-zealot Christina. Follow these simple rules and you are your friends will be laughing your way out of the devil’s clutches (FUN!) 
1. Throw a burlap sack over the head of your infirm sister’s unsuspecting friend and force her into a mud pit. 
2. Ask the burlap-ensconced friend the most rhetorical of all rhetorical questions: “Does your sin taste bitter in your mouth?” 
3. If she complains, hit her with the hard facts. Like this:
“The mud’s cold,” said Mary. 
“The hell fires are hot,” said Christina. 
4. Convince that aquaphobic sinner to dunk herself in a freezing stream for three minutes to absolve her of her sins. Shout a prayer to God over her about how only a sinner would wear burlap.
5. Give her some colored pencils and send her on her way. 
Adult-appropriate mind-games included inside!

Today’s daily desk copy request: Jane Bowles Two Serious Ladies: A Novel for a course on “writing and sexual politics.”

A cult classic and the only novel by Jane Bowles, the highly influential wife of Paul Bowles, Two Serious Ladies (1943) follows two upper-class women, Christina Goering and Frieda Copperfield, as they descend into debauchery. 

If that description isn’t enough to get you excited, you should also know that it was Tennessee Williams’ favorite novel AND your new source for under-utilized children’s games.

Example: “I forgive you of all your sins.”

This one comes from everyone’s favorite child-zealot Christina. Follow these simple rules and you are your friends will be laughing your way out of the devil’s clutches (FUN!) 

1. Throw a burlap sack over the head of your infirm sister’s unsuspecting friend and force her into a mud pit.

2. Ask the burlap-ensconced friend the most rhetorical of all rhetorical questions: “Does your sin taste bitter in your mouth?”

3. If she complains, hit her with the hard facts. Like this:

“The mud’s cold,” said Mary.

“The hell fires are hot,” said Christina.

4. Convince that aquaphobic sinner to dunk herself in a freezing stream for three minutes to absolve her of her sins. Shout a prayer to God over her about how only a sinner would wear burlap.

5. Give her some colored pencils and send her on her way.

Adult-appropriate mind-games included inside!

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Robert Dallek’s Camelot’s Court: Inside the Kennedy White House for a course on 20th century U.S. history.
I always thought it was a little weird that Kennedy supporters promoted the Camelot comparison. Yes, there were some really great years there. Fun times chasing that damned elusive Grail. Undoubtedly a lot of wild parties & widespread idealism. But then there was that whole “I accidentally slept with my half-sister, inadverdently spawning my greatest enemy” plotline + all that cuckolding of Arthur at the hands of his dear wife and bff.  You did NOT want to be a cuckold in Arthurian times. It was the equivalent of someone calling you a “man unbefitting of my respect” + *expletives* today.
Anyway—in Camelot’s Court, Dallek, THE Kennedy biographer for those in the know, delivers a riveting new portrait of this president and his inner circle of advisors—their rivalries, personality clashes, and political battles.
Here’s a fun game for your students: match the Kennedy brain-truster with his Arthurian counterpart.
1. Attorney General Robert Kennedy2. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara3. Secretary of State Dean Rusk4. National Security Adviser McGeorge Bundy5. Trusted aide Ted Sorensen6. Trusted aide #2 Arthur Schlesinger 7. Kennedy’s personal secretary Evelyn Lincoln (brain trust-adjacent)a. Gawaine, the gruff “Maidens’ Knight”b. Mordred, the power-hungry evil spawnc. Galahad, the heaven-bound bored. Lancelot, the skilled one with questionable friendship skillse. Gareth, the mama’s boyf. Lamorak, the Lothario with a penchant for grandmothersg. Morgan Le Faye, jealous witch (This is a free one, because obviously this is the woman I threw in there. Also, most women are witches of some sort in Arthurian lit because of the patriarchy.)

Today’s daily desk copy request: Robert Dallek’s Camelot’s Court: Inside the Kennedy White House for a course on 20th century U.S. history.

I always thought it was a little weird that Kennedy supporters promoted the Camelot comparison. Yes, there were some really great years there. Fun times chasing that damned elusive Grail. Undoubtedly a lot of wild parties & widespread idealism. But then there was that whole “I accidentally slept with my half-sister, inadverdently spawning my greatest enemy” plotline + all that cuckolding of Arthur at the hands of his dear wife and bff.  You did NOT want to be a cuckold in Arthurian times. It was the equivalent of someone calling you a “man unbefitting of my respect” + *expletives* today.

Anyway—in Camelot’s Court, Dallek, THE Kennedy biographer for those in the know, delivers a riveting new portrait of this president and his inner circle of advisors—their rivalries, personality clashes, and political battles.

Here’s a fun game for your students: match the Kennedy brain-truster with his Arthurian counterpart.

1. Attorney General Robert Kennedy
2. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara
3. Secretary of State Dean Rusk
4. National Security Adviser McGeorge Bundy
5. Trusted aide Ted Sorensen
6. Trusted aide #2 Arthur Schlesinger 
7. Kennedy’s personal secretary Evelyn Lincoln (brain trust-adjacent)

a. Gawaine, the gruff “
Maidens’ Knight”
b. Mordred, the power-hungry evil spawn
c. Galahad, the heaven-bound bore
d. Lancelot, the skilled one with questionable friendship skills
e. Gareth, the mama’s boy
f. Lamorak, the Lothario with a penchant for grandmothers
g. Morgan Le Faye, jealous witch (This is a free one, because obviously this is the woman I threw in there. Also, most women are witches of some sort in Arthurian lit because of the patriarchy.)

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Today’s daily desk copy request: The Truman Show: The Shooting Script for an introduction to literary studies course.
Late in life, when I sit down to write my reminiscences (to be bequeathed to my hoard of ungrateful gerbils upon my death), that time I went to go see The Truman Show will certainly take up the bulk of my “Metaphysical Meltdowns” section, because I just wasn’t prepared for it. I thought I was going to see another lighthearted romp starring the Franciscan sleuth who once hilariously sported asparagus-tusks. Instead, I got a movie that led me to question whether my father was actually a paid actor, and whether my world was really just a grand facsimile of the real world—an arcological dome constructed and paid for by Lifetime. When I still have suspicions of being Truman-ed, I think, “You can’t possibly be being Truman-ed, no one would want to watch you eat peanut butter off of a fork for 3 hours!” Then I remember that Bravo is currently airing a reality show about people watching reality shows, and the peanut butter thing sounds pretty compelling.  
But I’m not the only one tormented by such questions post-Truman! There’s even a set of psychological delusions dubbed “Truman Syndrome” for short. So assign it to your students, and support local therapists.   

Today’s daily desk copy request: The Truman Show: The Shooting Script for an introduction to literary studies course.

Late in life, when I sit down to write my reminiscences (to be bequeathed to my hoard of ungrateful gerbils upon my death), that time I went to go see The Truman Show will certainly take up the bulk of my “Metaphysical Meltdowns” section, because I just wasn’t prepared for it. I thought I was going to see another lighthearted romp starring the Franciscan sleuth who once hilariously sported asparagus-tusks. Instead, I got a movie that led me to question whether my father was actually a paid actor, and whether my world was really just a grand facsimile of the real world—an arcological dome constructed and paid for by Lifetime. When I still have suspicions of being Truman-ed, I think, “You can’t possibly be being Truman-ed, no one would want to watch you eat peanut butter off of a fork for 3 hours!” Then I remember that Bravo is currently airing a reality show about people watching reality shows, and the peanut butter thing sounds pretty compelling.  

But I’m not the only one tormented by such questions post-Truman! There’s even a set of psychological delusions dubbed “Truman Syndrome” for short. So assign it to your students, and support local therapists.   

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Christopher Buckley’s Little Green Men for a class on pseudoscience and conspiracy theory.
SPEAKING OF UFOs (which is my favorite non sequitur to yell over people):
Beltway insider and stuffy talk show host John Oliver Banion* finds his privileged life turned topsy-turvy when he is abducted by aliens from his exclusive country-club golf course. Now, like many of us, he might have been able to brush off this initial abduction and gone on to lead a relatively normal life, but then ole John is abducted a second time.  Believing he has found his true calling (much to family and friends’ protestations), John begins a crusade, demanding that Congress and the White House seriously investigate the existence of extraterrestrials and UFOs.** A comic tour de force from “one of the best and surest political humorists in America” (Los Angeles Times Book Review), Little Green Men is an uproarious comedy of manners that proves once and for all that the truth is out there. (In the way that space is “out there”).
*Name derived from Job, the Bible’s human punching bag beleaguered by a cosmic bet gone twisted.
**Which hearkens back to that famous old saying: “Abduct me once, shame on you. Abduct me twice, NOW IT’S CONGRESS’S PROBLEM.

Today’s daily desk copy request: Christopher Buckley’s Little Green Men for a class on pseudoscience and conspiracy theory.

SPEAKING OF UFOs (which is my favorite non sequitur to yell over people):

Beltway insider and stuffy talk show host John Oliver Banion* finds his privileged life turned topsy-turvy when he is abducted by aliens from his exclusive country-club golf course. Now, like many of us, he might have been able to brush off this initial abduction and gone on to lead a relatively normal life, but then ole John is abducted a second time.  Believing he has found his true calling (much to family and friends’ protestations), John begins a crusade, demanding that Congress and the White House seriously investigate the existence of extraterrestrials and UFOs.** A comic tour de force from “one of the best and surest political humorists in America” (Los Angeles Times Book Review), Little Green Men is an uproarious comedy of manners that proves once and for all that the truth is out there. (In the way that space is “out there”).

*Name derived from Job, the Bible’s human punching bag beleaguered by a cosmic bet gone twisted.

**Which hearkens back to that famous old saying: “Abduct me once, shame on you. Abduct me twice, NOW IT’S CONGRESS’S PROBLEM.

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Jennifer Senior’s All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenting for a cultural history course.
Thousands of books have examined the effects of parents on their children. But almost none have thought to ask: what are the effects of children on their parents? 
In All Joy and No Fun, award-winning journalist Jennifer Senior tries to tackle this question, isolating and analyzing the many ways children reshape their parents’ lives. Recruiting from a wide variety of sources—in history, sociology, economics, psychology, philosophy, and anthropology—she dissects both the timeless strains of parenting and the ones that are brand new, and then brings her research to life in the homes of ordinary parents around the country. The result is an unforgettable series of family portraits, following mothers and fathers as they wrestle with some of parenthood’s deepest vexations—and luxuriate in some of its finest rewards. My cousin recently had a baby, so I know a little something about parenthood’s greatest vexations. A couple weeks after she gave birth, I came to see the blessed child at home. Feeling a surge of familial affection, I asked to hold said baby, and my cousin obliged. I reveled in his cuteness for a moment, until I realized that my cousin has left me alone with the child—which, it should be said, was a strange choice, as this was the very same baby I had referred to as a succubus for most of her pregnancy. There, alone in the room, the whole “being responsible for another human being” thing washed over me, and I was struck by a kind of paralyzing fear I had not known before. I wanted to just leave the baby on the bed and run to get my cousin, but we all know that if you leave a baby alone for more than a minute, it’s bound to get into some SERIOUS high jinx.  I couldn’t walk with the baby to go get my cousin, because I have a very limited knowledge of medicine, and I didn’t want my naturally vigorous walking pace to induce shaken baby syndrome. So there I was, left alone with a baby. There was only one option: I had to keep poking it to make sure it was still breathing—a task which was very exhausting for both of us. I almost fainted from the sheer exertion of it.

Later, I got to luxuriate in the rewards of not accidentally killing my cousin’s baby, because she gave me jelly beans. 

Today’s daily desk copy request: Jennifer Senior’s All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenting for a cultural history course.

Thousands of books have examined the effects of parents on their children. But almost none have thought to ask: what are the effects of children on their parents

In All Joy and No Fun, award-winning journalist Jennifer Senior tries to tackle this question, isolating and analyzing the many ways children reshape their parents’ lives. Recruiting from a wide variety of sources—in history, sociology, economics, psychology, philosophy, and anthropology—she dissects both the timeless strains of parenting and the ones that are brand new, and then brings her research to life in the homes of ordinary parents around the country. The result is an unforgettable series of family portraits, following mothers and fathers as they wrestle with some of parenthood’s deepest vexations—and luxuriate in some of its finest rewards.

My cousin recently had a baby, so I know a little something about parenthood’s greatest vexations. A couple weeks after she gave birth, I came to see the blessed child at home. Feeling a surge of familial affection, I asked to hold said baby, and my cousin obliged. I reveled in his cuteness for a moment, until I realized that my cousin has left me alone with the child—which, it should be said, was a strange choice, as this was the very same baby I had referred to as a succubus for most of her pregnancy. There, alone in the room, the whole “being responsible for another human being” thing washed over me, and I was struck by a kind of paralyzing fear I had not known before. I wanted to just leave the baby on the bed and run to get my cousin, but we all know that if you leave a baby alone for more than a minute, it’s bound to get into some SERIOUS high jinx.  I couldn’t walk with the baby to go get my cousin, because I have a very limited knowledge of medicine, and I didn’t want my naturally vigorous walking pace to induce shaken baby syndrome. So there I was, left alone with a baby. There was only one option: I had to keep poking it to make sure it was still breathing—a task which was very exhausting for both of us. I almost fainted from the sheer exertion of it.

Later, I got to luxuriate in the rewards of not accidentally killing my cousin’s baby, because she gave me jelly beans. 

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Roy Choi, Tien Nguyen, and Natasha Phan’s L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food for an English class on cooking literature.
Abounding with both the food and the stories that gave rise to Roy Choi’s inspired cooking, L.A. Son takes us through the neighborhoods and streets most tourists never see, from the kitchen of his parents’ Korean restaurant and his mother’s pungent kimchi to the boulevards of East L.A. and the best taquerias in the country, to, at last, the curbside view from one of his emblematic Kogi taco trucks, where people from all walks of life line up for a revolutionary meal. Filled with over 85 inspired recipes that meld the overlapping traditions and flavors of L.A., L.A. Son embodies the sense of invention, resourcefulness, and hybrid attitude of the city from which it takes its name, as it tells the transporting story of how a Korean American kid went from lowriding in the streets of L.A. to becoming an acclaimed chef.
L.A. Son is really a love letter to Los Angeles, and, having just been there in February, I understand Choi’s enthusiasm for “The Big Orange” (as no one calls it). While there, I saw ALL the celebrities* and not a single rat leered at me in a privileged sort of way.
*By this, I mean Cory Booker sat next to me at lunch. I know this because he said, “Hi, I’m Cory Booker” to someone and looked a bit like what I think Cory Booker looks like. I did not tell my friend that this was how I recognized him, because I have always wanted to be mistaken for someone who watches C-SPAN. 

Today’s daily desk copy request: Roy Choi, Tien Nguyen, and Natasha Phan’s L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food for an English class on cooking literature.

Abounding with both the food and the stories that gave rise to Roy Choi’s inspired cooking, L.A. Son takes us through the neighborhoods and streets most tourists never see, from the kitchen of his parents’ Korean restaurant and his mother’s pungent kimchi to the boulevards of East L.A. and the best taquerias in the country, to, at last, the curbside view from one of his emblematic Kogi taco trucks, where people from all walks of life line up for a revolutionary meal. Filled with over 85 inspired recipes that meld the overlapping traditions and flavors of L.A., L.A. Son embodies the sense of invention, resourcefulness, and hybrid attitude of the city from which it takes its name, as it tells the transporting story of how a Korean American kid went from lowriding in the streets of L.A. to becoming an acclaimed chef.

L.A. Son is really a love letter to Los Angeles, and, having just been there in February, I understand Choi’s enthusiasm for “The Big Orange” (as no one calls it). While there, I saw ALL the celebrities* and not a single rat leered at me in a privileged sort of way.

*By this, I mean Cory Booker sat next to me at lunch. I know this because he said, “Hi, I’m Cory Booker” to someone and looked a bit like what I think Cory Booker looks like. I did not tell my friend that this was how I recognized him, because I have always wanted to be mistaken for someone who watches C-SPAN. 

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Tony Barr’s Acting for the Camera, Revised Edition for a theater class.
Culled from Tony Barr’s 40 years’ experience as a performer, director and acting teacher in Hollywood, this highly praised handbook provides readers with the practical knowledge they need when performing in front of the camera. This updated edition includes plenty of new exercises for honing on-camera skills; additional chapters on imagination and movement; and fresh material on character development, monologues, visual focus, playing comedy and working with directors.
Barr’s book is considered a classic in theater courses, but if your students need some more hot tips, here is my personal advice:
-The more hand gestures the better! Especially the kind where you wag your finger in someone else’s face. (This tip applies to everyday conversations as well).
-If you know you’re going to have to cry in a scene, prepare! Hide an extra sharp pin in your pocket and slowly dig it into your skin at the appropriate moment.
-If you have to look pensive in a scene, think of the hardest riddle you know (example: 2 + x = 4).
-SPRAY TAN! It will make your audience jumpy and unfocused if they think a ghost is stuck in the TV.   

Personal camera-skills classes available upon request, but they are *EXTREMELY* pricey and come with no guarantees.  

Today’s daily desk copy request: Tony Barr’s Acting for the Camera, Revised Edition for a theater class.

Culled from Tony Barr’s 40 years’ experience as a performer, director and acting teacher in Hollywood, this highly praised handbook provides readers with the practical knowledge they need when performing in front of the camera. This updated edition includes plenty of new exercises for honing on-camera skills; additional chapters on imagination and movement; and fresh material on character development, monologues, visual focus, playing comedy and working with directors.

Barr’s book is considered a classic in theater courses, but if your students need some more hot tips, here is my personal advice:

-The more hand gestures the better! Especially the kind where you wag your finger in someone else’s face. (This tip applies to everyday conversations as well).

-If you know you’re going to have to cry in a scene, prepare! Hide an extra sharp pin in your pocket and slowly dig it into your skin at the appropriate moment.

-If you have to look pensive in a scene, think of the hardest riddle you know (example: 2 + x = 4).

-SPRAY TAN! It will make your audience jumpy and unfocused if they think a ghost is stuck in the TV.   

Personal camera-skills classes available upon request, but they are *EXTREMELY* pricey and come with no guarantees.  

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Doris Lessing’s The Grass is Singing for a course on South African Literature.
The Grass is Singing is the first novel ever published by Doris Lessing, the woman who responded to winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in the same way you might respond to learning that your third favorite Aunt has arrived, uninvited, for an extended stay at your home (“Oh Christ.” [drops grocery bag]). But when you have won all the prizes Europe’s got to offer, you’re 88, and you’ve got stuff in your hands, cartwheels are not really an option.  
This is probably the most consistently adopted of all Lessing’s works—I get requests for it almost every day. Set in Southern Rhodesia under white rule, The Grass is Singing is both a riveting chronicle of human disintegration and a beautifully understated social critique. Mary Turner is a self-confident, independent young woman who becomes the depressed, frustrated wife of an ineffectual, unsuccessful farmer. Little by little the ennui of years on the farm work their slow poison, and Mary’s despair progresses until the fateful arrival of an enigmatic black servant, Moses. Locked in anguish, Mary and Moses are trapped in a web of mounting attraction and repulsion. Their psychic tension explodes in an electrifying scene that ends this disturbing tale of racial strife in colonial Southern Africa. 
To see the video of Lessing learning of her Nobel win, click here. You will emerge a sassier person for it.  

Today’s daily desk copy request: Doris Lessing’s The Grass is Singing for a course on South African Literature.

The Grass is Singing is the first novel ever published by Doris Lessing, the woman who responded to winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in the same way you might respond to learning that your third favorite Aunt has arrived, uninvited, for an extended stay at your home (“Oh Christ.” [drops grocery bag]). But when you have won all the prizes Europe’s got to offer, you’re 88, and you’ve got stuff in your hands, cartwheels are not really an option.  

This is probably the most consistently adopted of all Lessing’s works—I get requests for it almost every day. Set in Southern Rhodesia under white rule, The Grass is Singing is both a riveting chronicle of human disintegration and a beautifully understated social critique. Mary Turner is a self-confident, independent young woman who becomes the depressed, frustrated wife of an ineffectual, unsuccessful farmer. Little by little the ennui of years on the farm work their slow poison, and Mary’s despair progresses until the fateful arrival of an enigmatic black servant, Moses. Locked in anguish, Mary and Moses are trapped in a web of mounting attraction and repulsion. Their psychic tension explodes in an electrifying scene that ends this disturbing tale of racial strife in colonial Southern Africa.

To see the video of Lessing learning of her Nobel win, click here. You will emerge a sassier person for it.  

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Today’s daily desk copy request: David Edmond and John Eidinow’s #1 National Bestseller Wittgenstein’s Poker for a class on the “History of 20th Century Analytic Philosophy”
Riddle me this: What happens when a bunch of epistemologists can’t agree on the facts of an event they all witnessed?
You don’t have to answer, that was rhetorical and hilarious. 
It was just your average meeting of the Moral Science Club in the fall of 1946. No one expected anything crazy going down, because it was a club dedicated to the study of “moral science”. The Felonious Earth Science Cooperative down the hall…sure. But “moral science”?
But then Karl Popper enters the room—a man whose favorite activities include bragging about destroying logical positivism (which, to the philosophy-obtuse, sounds like nothing to brag about), and not mouth-kissing his wife.* And who does he see but that damned Ludwig Wittgenstein, deified champion of logical positivism with a stick-wielding history. The two men, united by “sheer awfulness,” get into a bitter confrontation, illuminating the vast ideological divide that prevailed at the time. Their heated debate, which lasts ten minutes, becomes the stuff of legend, as rumors spread around the world that the two great philosophers had come to blows, armed with red-hot pokers. But what really happened? Even those present wildly disagree. An engaging mix of philosophy, history, biography, and literary detection, Wittgenstein’s Poker explores, through the Popper/Wittgenstein confrontation, the history of philosophy in the twentieth century.
*I did not make this up

Today’s daily desk copy request: David Edmond and John Eidinow’s #1 National Bestseller Wittgenstein’s Poker for a class on the “History of 20th Century Analytic Philosophy”

Riddle me this: What happens when a bunch of epistemologists can’t agree on the facts of an event they all witnessed?

You don’t have to answer, that was rhetorical and hilarious.

It was just your average meeting of the Moral Science Club in the fall of 1946. No one expected anything crazy going down, because it was a club dedicated to the study of “moral science”. The Felonious Earth Science Cooperative down the hall…sure. But “moral science”?

But then Karl Popper enters the room—a man whose favorite activities include bragging about destroying logical positivism (which, to the philosophy-obtuse, sounds like nothing to brag about), and not mouth-kissing his wife.* And who does he see but that damned Ludwig Wittgenstein, deified champion of logical positivism with a stick-wielding history. The two men, united by “sheer awfulness,” get into a bitter confrontation, illuminating the vast ideological divide that prevailed at the time. Their heated debate, which lasts ten minutes, becomes the stuff of legend, as rumors spread around the world that the two great philosophers had come to blows, armed with red-hot pokers. But what really happened? Even those present wildly disagree. An engaging mix of philosophy, history, biography, and literary detection, Wittgenstein’s Poker explores, through the Popper/Wittgenstein confrontation, the history of philosophy in the twentieth century.

*I did not make this up

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Today’s daily desk copy request: Michael Carroll’s Lab 257: The Disturbing Story of the Government’s Secret Germ Laboratory for an introductory biology course.
Our government keeps a lot of secrets from us. Mainly the whole Roswell thing, but I’ve been told there are others.  So add this one to your list:
Nestled within a stone’s throw of P Diddy’s annual Hamptons White Party lies Plum Island, an unimposing, pork-chop-shaped mass unidentified on most maps. For those generally suspicious of  unidentified pork-chop-shaped islands:
1. Get a less specific preoccupation.  

But also,
2. Good work, because this meat-reminiscent isle plays home to the deadliest germs that have ever roamed the planet, and was dubbed by one optimistic insider as the “biological Three Mile Island.”

Based on innumerable declassified government documents, scores of in-depth interviews, and access to Plum Island itself, this is an eye-opening, suspenseful account of a federal government germ laboratory gone terribly wrong. For the first time, Lab 257 takes you deep inside this secret world and presents startling revelations including virus outbreaks, biological meltdowns, infected workers who were denied assistance in diagnosis by Plum Island brass, the periodic flushing of contaminated raw sewage into area waters, and the insidious connections between Plum Island, Lyme disease, and the deadly 1999 West Nile virus outbreak.
Luckily it sits nowhere near any of the United States’ most bustling metropolises!
Sike! It’s right by New York, the most bustling of bustling populations. MOVE TO THE YUKON OR BE A BIOLOGICALLY COMPROMISED FOOL FOREVER.  

Today’s daily desk copy request: Michael Carroll’s Lab 257: The Disturbing Story of the Government’s Secret Germ Laboratory for an introductory biology course.

Our government keeps a lot of secrets from us. Mainly the whole Roswell thing, but I’ve been told there are others.  So add this one to your list:

Nestled within a stone’s throw of P Diddy’s annual Hamptons White Party lies Plum Island, an unimposing, pork-chop-shaped mass unidentified on most maps. For those generally suspicious of  unidentified pork-chop-shaped islands:

1. Get a less specific preoccupation.  

But also,

2. Good work, because this meat-reminiscent isle plays home to the deadliest germs that have ever roamed the planet, and was dubbed by one optimistic insider as the “biological Three Mile Island.”

Based on innumerable declassified government documents, scores of in-depth interviews, and access to Plum Island itself, this is an eye-opening, suspenseful account of a federal government germ laboratory gone terribly wrong. For the first time, Lab 257 takes you deep inside this secret world and presents startling revelations including virus outbreaks, biological meltdowns, infected workers who were denied assistance in diagnosis by Plum Island brass, the periodic flushing of contaminated raw sewage into area waters, and the insidious connections between Plum Island, Lyme disease, and the deadly 1999 West Nile virus outbreak.

Luckily it sits nowhere near any of the United States’ most bustling metropolises!

Sike! It’s right by New York, the most bustling of bustling populations. MOVE TO THE YUKON OR BE A BIOLOGICALLY COMPROMISED FOOL FOREVER.